Pitch Wars Interview with Luanne Smith and her mentor, Caitlin Sinead

PW Interviews

Our mentors are editing, our mentees are revising, and we hope you’re making progress on your own manuscript! While we’re all working toward the Agent Showcase on November 3rd-9th, we hope you’ll take a moment during your writing breaks and get to know our 2016 Pitch Wars Teams.

And now, we have . . . 

LGSmith

Luanne Smith – Mentee

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Caitlin Sinead

Caitlin Sinead – Mentor

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Luanne: Why did you choose Caitlin?

As soon as I read Caitlin’s bio I knew she’d be a great choice. Her education is impressive (masters in writing from Johns Hopkins University, hello!), she’s the author of two published novels, and she has a great agent. But then I read her wish list where she asked for “science fiction/fantasy, stories involving politics, or a romance with a hero who is a bodyguard, cop, or other type of protector.” That combination pretty much sums up my novel.

Caitlin: Why did you choose Luanne’s manuscript?

Early on in the novel the main character, Cira, the leader of a future society, needs to decide how to handle the death of her husband. Not emotionally. Not mentally. But politically. Her discussions with her advisor fascinated me and I was drawn in for the rest of the ride.

Luanne: Summarize your book in three words.

Murder. Betrayal. Love.

Caitlin: Summarize Luanne’s book in three words.

Resilient. Inventive. Romantic.

Luanne: Tell us about yourself. What makes you and your MS unique?

When your last name is Smith you never really get a sense of the unique, you know? But one thing special that I bring to my story is, as a former law enforcement officer, I know what it’s like to be a young woman doing dangerous work in a field dominated by men. My character is a warrior, a commander, and her nation’s Protector. Women who choose this type of work know they’re tough, so I didn’t want it to be another story about proving she’s as good as the men. She already is. She’s very capable, and she’s absolutely in charge. The more interesting question to me was how does a woman like this deal with the other, perhaps more vulnerable, side of her political position, that of having to produce an heir. Being a woman and a warrior, it creates some conflict for her. And, of course, there are disturbing incidents from her past affecting her choices, so everything sort of goes sideways from there.

Caitlin: Tell us about yourself. Something we might not already know.

I recently had a baby boy. It’s been very cool reading to him and wondering what he can and can’t grasp at each developmental stage. It’s also been fun to be exposed to all these wonderful picture books. It’s a nice reminder that reading is a life-long journey.

 

Check out Caitlin Sinead’s latest release . . .

Red Blooded

Instead of eating ramen and meeting frat guys like most college freshmen, Peyton Arthur is on the campaign trail. Traveling with her mother, the Democratic pick for vice president, she’s ordering room service, sneaking glances at cute campaign intern Dylan and deflecting interview questions about the tragic loss of her father. But when a reporter questions her paternity, her world goes into a tailspin.

Dylan left Yale and joined the campaign to make a difference, not keep tabs on some girl. But with the paternity scandal blowing up and Peyton asking questions, he’s been tasked to watch her every move. As he gets to know the real Peyton, he finds it harder and harder to keep a professional distance.

When the media demands a story, Peyton and Dylan give them one—a fake relationship. As they work together to investigate the rumors about her real father and Peyton gets closer to learning the truth, she’s also getting closer to Dylan. And suddenly, it’s not just her past on the line anymore. It’s her heart.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Goodreads | Kobo | iBooks 

Thank you for supporting our Pitch Wars Teams! And don’t forget to stop by the Agent Showcase starting November 3rd to see how our teams do in the final round.

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